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Posted by Samina Cabral
Samina Cabral
Samina Cabral is a native Southern Californian who now resides on the shores of
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on Tuesday, 26 March 2013
in Earth Blog

A Bigger Population Means A Greater Need To Prepare for Bad Weather

NOAA says that if the current population trends continue, the United States coastal population will grow weather-vane-stryker-mfilefrom 123 million people to nearly 134 million people smugly ensconced in coastal communities by 2020.
The agency noted the coasts are already crowed and the projected increase in population will put more people at risk from extreme coastal weather and storms like Sandy. Get out! Get out while you still can! I hear the Midwest and Northeast are both nice and roomy.

However, don’t be surprised when a storm like Sandy affects you when you thought it wouldn’t because you don’t live on the Atlantic

The United States Census Bureau helped NOAA prepare the report that delivered the news.  After analyzing data from the 2010 census they said that 39 percent of the country’s population is concentrated in counties directly on the shoreline-- less than 10 percent of the total U.S. land area excluding Alaska. Slightly over half, 52 percent, of the total population lives in counties that drain to coastal watersheds, less than 20 percent of U.S. land area, excluding Alaska. I don’t know why Alaska has been excluded but it must have something to do with the Palins.

“People who live near the shore, and managers of these coastal communities, should be aware of how this population growth may affect their coastal areas over time,” said Holly Bamford, Ph.D., assistant NOAA administrator for the National Ocean Service. “As more people move to the coast, county managers will see a dual challenge -- protecting a growing population from coastal hazards, as well as protecting coastal ecosystems from a growing population.”

What other sort of hazards could befall people living in coastal communities besides hurricanes and devastating storms?  Tsunamis.

Sunday, March 24th was the kick off of Tsunami Preparedness Week. NOAA encourages people across the country to be Weather-Ready and specifically, Tsunami Ready if you are a resident of a state with a Pacific coastline. NOAA says: “Schools, playgrounds, hospitals, factories and homes are often built in areas vulnerable to tsunamis.” So pretty much everything.

flood-hurricane-kconnors-mfileIf you live in a coastal and earthquake-prone state being prepared for a tsunami is extremely important.  Though the the tsunami threat level for the East and Gulf of Mexico coasts is low when compared to the Pacific and Caribbean coasts it’s still there. The same goes for Alaska: the threat level for the Alaska Bering Sea and Arctic coasts is very low when compared to the southern coast of Alaska.

Anyone who lives near a large body of water (ocean or lake) should be prepared for any natural disaster that can be caused by some nasty weather.

For more information please visit the Weather-Ready Nation website.

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Samina Cabral is a native Southern Californian who now resides on the shores of Lake Erie in Northeast Ohio. Samina and her husband believe that sustainability starts in the home and try to live their lives as simply as possible without compromising comfort.

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1944: Camano Class Light Cargo Ship was laid down for the US Army as FS-289 at Wheeler Shipbuilding in Whitestone, NY.

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1945: Delivered to US Army.

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1950: Acquired by the US Navy on July 1, 1950 and placed in service as USNS New Bedford (T-AKL-17).

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1954: The movie, Mister Roberts, was made on the USNS New Bedford (T-AKL-17).

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1955 - 1963: Used as a cargo supply ship for the Texas Towers, a network of advanced radar stations located off the Eastern Seaboard. In 1957, Capt. Sixto Mangual was commander of the AKL-17 and in 1961 it was rechristened the USNS New Bedford. The New Bedford, sailing out of State Pier, was keeping vigil when Texas Tower No. 4 callapsed off the New Jersey coast during a January 1961 nor'easter.

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1963: Reclassified as Miscellaneous Unclassified (IX-308).

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1971: The New Bedford (IX-308) served as a Torpedo Test Firing Vessel in the Puget Sound area.

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1994: Ceremony in New Bedford.

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1995: The ship was struck from the Naval Register on April 4.

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2004: The Sea Bird's current disposition is a tuna long liner (fishing boat) out of San Diego, CA.

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2006: Design of the Tesla Turbine began on June 11, 2006. The Sea Bird was sold by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service for commercial service.

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2007: The Sea Bird was drydocked for renovations.

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2008: The Sea Bird setting sail to Sea-Tac in Seattle, WA.

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2009 - 2010: The Sea Bird is currently docked at Seattle Sea-Tac.

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