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Posted by Andrew Rossillo
Andrew Rossillo
Hello there, I’m the staff writer for SeaBirdAdventure.com. This is an exception
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on Monday, 08 August 2011
in Clean Factoids

Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About Sharks

Whether some of the great minds behind today’s efforts at innovation are willingly to admit it or not, much of what we aspire to accomplish with future technologies often mirrors what certain species are already naturally capable of. As our technological capabilities and achievements continue to grow at exponential rates, it’s increasingly important for us to maintain appreciation for the innate abilities found within the earth’s creatures, reinforcing the great importance of environmental conservation. And with ancestral roots dating back millions and millions of years, building off our current knowledge of sharks provides an ideal example of living learning tools.

Frequently Asked Shark Questions

What’s the largest species of shark? Not only is the whale shark the biggest species of shark, this ocean-blue blimp also holds the record for the world’s biggest fish.     

What’s scarier than the thought of several rows of razor-sharp teeth? The realization that there’s significant intelligence behind the use of those teeth. Just how big is the brain of a shark? Both the size and shape of a shark’s brain varies significantly from species to species. Generally speaking though, sharks do feature a significant ratio of brain mass to body mass. And while the brain-to-body mass ratio for humans is much greater than sharks, the often heard statement that all sharks have a brain the size of a walnut is simply an inaccurate generalization. In fact, thorough dissection has showed us that shark brains can actually be quite complex.

By what process do sharks mate? Sharks are typically very private, protective of their breeding process which means we are still relatively limited in our viewings of the actual mating process. However, based on the recorded observations that we do have combined with some key variations in anatomy we do know that there are some differences in the way that certain species breed. Furthermore, we know that a majority of shark species conduct their breeding while swimming parallel to one another where the male shark uses his clasper to insert into the female’s oviduct.

How do sharks communicate with each other? We are certain that they do call on the use of body language, bumping each other, and the proximity or how close they swim to each other as means of communicating with each other. However, this is an area that continues to be heavily researched and there are a variety of fascinating theories that go above and beyond these fundamental methods. Some go so far as to question the ability of sharks to communicate through purely mental paths without making any sounds or vibrations…a very fishy ESP.

A vital component of protecting the earth’s creatures is using the power of fascination and the desire to learn more about the world around us.


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Hello there, I’m the staff writer for SeaBirdAdventure.com. This is an exceptional gig because I’m given the opportunity to combine my love for writing with my love for Mother Nature and exciting new technologies. Plus, I get to do it all alongside some very talented, earth-conscious folks—very nice combination. But this certainly isn’t all about me. I invite all of you to comment on my blog posts, add your three cents, and even suggest future topics for me to write about. This is most definitely a combined effort. A blog post every single day? Sure thing…comin’ right up. Check back daily for new posts, tell your friends, tell your cat, and think and do green. To your green future, Andrew Rossillo

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1944: Camano Class Light Cargo Ship was laid down for the US Army as FS-289 at Wheeler Shipbuilding in Whitestone, NY.

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1945: Delivered to US Army.

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1950: Acquired by the US Navy on July 1, 1950 and placed in service as USNS New Bedford (T-AKL-17).

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1954: The movie, Mister Roberts, was made on the USNS New Bedford (T-AKL-17).

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1955 - 1963: Used as a cargo supply ship for the Texas Towers, a network of advanced radar stations located off the Eastern Seaboard. In 1957, Capt. Sixto Mangual was commander of the AKL-17 and in 1961 it was rechristened the USNS New Bedford. The New Bedford, sailing out of State Pier, was keeping vigil when Texas Tower No. 4 callapsed off the New Jersey coast during a January 1961 nor'easter.

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1963: Reclassified as Miscellaneous Unclassified (IX-308).

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1971: The New Bedford (IX-308) served as a Torpedo Test Firing Vessel in the Puget Sound area.

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1994: Ceremony in New Bedford.

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1995: The ship was struck from the Naval Register on April 4.

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2004: The Sea Bird's current disposition is a tuna long liner (fishing boat) out of San Diego, CA.

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2006: Design of the Tesla Turbine began on June 11, 2006. The Sea Bird was sold by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service for commercial service.

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2007: The Sea Bird was drydocked for renovations.

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2008: The Sea Bird setting sail to Sea-Tac in Seattle, WA.

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2009 - 2010: The Sea Bird is currently docked at Seattle Sea-Tac.

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