An Eco-Friendly Company Since 2006!
    Join Now! 
Twitter YouTube RSS

Earth Blog

Individuals can help us by telling others, by being involved in the Earth Blog, by sharing your ideas with us and by forwarding your support to companies who you think should get involved!

Posted by Samina Cabral
Samina Cabral
Samina Cabral is a native Southern Californian who now resides on the shores of
User is currently offline
on Tuesday, 03 July 2012
in Clean Fun

Be a Patriot: Eat Ice Cream!

July is National Ice Cream month- as if you needed an official excuse to eat all the different types of frozen blue bunny ice cream wrightconfections there are on the planet this summer. But that is why we are here: to occasionally post a blog that you can point to and say: “I’ve been given permission by this extremely science-oriented blog and eco-friendly company!” Plus, it would be unpatriotic to not eat ice cream today.

This recognition month isn’t some unofficial ploy by Breyers or Dreyer’s (why are the names so similar?) to deceive you into purchasing ice cream. National Ice Cream Month and the included National Ice Cream Day -always the third Sunday in July- were proclaimed by President Ronald Reagan in 1984. He signed it into law saying “...I call upon the people of the United States to observe these events with appropriate ceremonies and activities.” He even said ice cream is “a fun and nutritious food.”

According to the USDA via the International Dairy Foods Association, in 2011 approximately 1.53 billion gallons of ice cream and frozen desserts were produced in the United States with the majority of ice cream being made in the U.S.’ central region- 726 million gallons.  9% of the milk produced by our dairy industry is used for ice cream. In total the industry generates over $21 billion in annual sales.

Now here is where we are going to rain on your holiday parade but just for a short time: ice cream has a middle of the road but still shocking carbon footprint.

The bestselling book, How Bad Are Bananas?, written by Mike Berners-Lee, founder of Small World Consulting, estimated ice cream’s carbon footprint. For the book’s purposes he uses carbon to represent all the GHG emissions and footprint as a metaphor “for the total impact that something has.”

50 g CO2e: a 60g popsicle from the supermarket eaten on the day of purchase.

500 g CO2e: a big dairy ice cream eaten from a dairy van

The popsicle has a smaller footprint than the dairy product obviously because it’s not made from milk which comes from cows. The popsicle is likely kept in an efficient freezer at the store. But do notice Berners-Lee only listed a single popsicle: who buys a single popsicle to eat that day? Everyone knows popsicles come in boxes of 20 or so -and what about your home freezer: is it as efficient as the one at the store?

cow mensaticThe “big dairy” from the ice cream truck with a not as efficient freezer estimate did come with a disclaimer

“I’ve guesstimated from a broad understanding of the footprint of different food ingredients and transport impacts and from knowing a little bit about mobile refrigeration.”

The solution: make your own ice cream! Last month Good Humor was reporting ice cream shortages for only a select few of their offerings: now is the perfect time to perfect your own recipe!

0 votes
Samina Cabral is a native Southern Californian who now resides on the shores of Lake Erie in Northeast Ohio. Samina and her husband believe that sustainability starts in the home and try to live their lives as simply as possible without compromising comfort.

Comments

Image Caption

1944: Camano Class Light Cargo Ship was laid down for the US Army as FS-289 at Wheeler Shipbuilding in Whitestone, NY.

Image Caption

1945: Delivered to US Army.

Image Caption

1950: Acquired by the US Navy on July 1, 1950 and placed in service as USNS New Bedford (T-AKL-17).

Image Caption

1954: The movie, Mister Roberts, was made on the USNS New Bedford (T-AKL-17).

Image Caption

1955 - 1963: Used as a cargo supply ship for the Texas Towers, a network of advanced radar stations located off the Eastern Seaboard. In 1957, Capt. Sixto Mangual was commander of the AKL-17 and in 1961 it was rechristened the USNS New Bedford. The New Bedford, sailing out of State Pier, was keeping vigil when Texas Tower No. 4 callapsed off the New Jersey coast during a January 1961 nor'easter.

Image Caption

1963: Reclassified as Miscellaneous Unclassified (IX-308).

Image Caption

1971: The New Bedford (IX-308) served as a Torpedo Test Firing Vessel in the Puget Sound area.

Image Caption

1994: Ceremony in New Bedford.

Image Caption

1995: The ship was struck from the Naval Register on April 4.

Image Caption

2004: The Sea Bird's current disposition is a tuna long liner (fishing boat) out of San Diego, CA.

Image Caption

2006: Design of the Tesla Turbine began on June 11, 2006. The Sea Bird was sold by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service for commercial service.

Image Caption

2007: The Sea Bird was drydocked for renovations.

Image Caption

2008: The Sea Bird setting sail to Sea-Tac in Seattle, WA.

Image Caption

2009 - 2010: The Sea Bird is currently docked at Seattle Sea-Tac.

Image Caption