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Posted by Samina Cabral
Samina Cabral
Samina Cabral is a native Southern Californian who now resides on the shores of
User is currently offline
on Tuesday, 05 June 2012
in Clean Fun

Break the Grip of the Rip

rip current lifeguard 20052During National Safe Boating Week last month NOAA didn’t talk about the dangers of rip currents and that’s because rip current safety gets its own week in June. This safety week is also brought to you by the National Park Service and U.S Lifesaving Association because summer is about to hit full swing and everyone is heading to the water, whether its the lake or beach.

NOAA describes rip currents as: “narrow channels of fast-moving water that pull swimmers away from the shore. They can occur at any beach with breaking waves, including the Great Lakes. They are common along the U.S. coastline even when the skies are clear. “ At their strongest rip currents can attain speeds reaching 8 feet per second.

41 people died last year in rip currents along the coasts of the United States and NOAA says on average more than one hundred people die each year from them. This average is greater than death from shark attacks.

Recently during Tropical Storm Beryl NOAA issued warnings from Florida to Virginia about rip currents but they still noted hundreds of rescues and there was one reported death.

NOAA has compiled this list of safety tips:
- Check NOAA’s surf zone forecasts.  
- Study how rip currents work and how to escape them.
- Swim at a beach with a lifeguard and talk with the lifeguard about the safest areas to swim.
- Observe and obey signs and flags posted to warn about rip currents.
- Never swim near jetties or piers where there are fixed rip currents.
- Don’t swim in a large body of water that is subject to changing wind, waves and currents unless you are a strong swimmer.
- Swim with a buddy, never alone.

If you get caught in the grip of a rip current:
- Yell for help immediately.
- Don’t swim against a rip current – it will just tire you out.
- Escape the rip current by swimming parallel to the beach until you are free.
- If you are unable to swim out of the rip current, float or calmly tread water.
- When out of the current, swim toward the shore at an angle away from the rip current.

Most importantly remember when swimming in any body of water: never swim alone, obey all signs, and try to stay calm in an emergency. Even the strongest of swimmers can forget how to avoid emergencies and accidents.

“Each year, America’s beach lifeguards rescue more than 50,000 swimmers from rip currents,” said B. Chris Brewster the president of the United States Lifesaving Association. “Swimming at a guarded beach can reduce your chances of drowning to 1 in 18 million.”

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Samina Cabral is a native Southern Californian who now resides on the shores of Lake Erie in Northeast Ohio. Samina and her husband believe that sustainability starts in the home and try to live their lives as simply as possible without compromising comfort.

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1944: Camano Class Light Cargo Ship was laid down for the US Army as FS-289 at Wheeler Shipbuilding in Whitestone, NY.

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1945: Delivered to US Army.

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1950: Acquired by the US Navy on July 1, 1950 and placed in service as USNS New Bedford (T-AKL-17).

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1954: The movie, Mister Roberts, was made on the USNS New Bedford (T-AKL-17).

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1955 - 1963: Used as a cargo supply ship for the Texas Towers, a network of advanced radar stations located off the Eastern Seaboard. In 1957, Capt. Sixto Mangual was commander of the AKL-17 and in 1961 it was rechristened the USNS New Bedford. The New Bedford, sailing out of State Pier, was keeping vigil when Texas Tower No. 4 callapsed off the New Jersey coast during a January 1961 nor'easter.

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1963: Reclassified as Miscellaneous Unclassified (IX-308).

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1971: The New Bedford (IX-308) served as a Torpedo Test Firing Vessel in the Puget Sound area.

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1994: Ceremony in New Bedford.

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1995: The ship was struck from the Naval Register on April 4.

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2004: The Sea Bird's current disposition is a tuna long liner (fishing boat) out of San Diego, CA.

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2006: Design of the Tesla Turbine began on June 11, 2006. The Sea Bird was sold by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service for commercial service.

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2007: The Sea Bird was drydocked for renovations.

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2008: The Sea Bird setting sail to Sea-Tac in Seattle, WA.

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2009 - 2010: The Sea Bird is currently docked at Seattle Sea-Tac.

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