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Posted by Andrew Rossillo
Andrew Rossillo
Hello there, I’m the staff writer for SeaBirdAdventure.com. This is an exception
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on Thursday, 01 September 2011
in Mother Nature's Vegetation

California's Native Grasses Could Be Pushed Aside by Exotic Species

In a new case study from the University of California, Berkeley, grasses native to California could be given the boot by exotic species, mainly due to the warming climate. Biologists at the university classified the area covered by all 258 grasses that are native to California and 177 alien grasses in the state. They then estimated how exactly the pending climate change would affect them all.

California's Native Grasses Competition with Exotic Species

Native Grasses Already Under Pressure

The native grasses of California are already in competition with the exotic imports for space. Native grasses tend to be smaller in stature and therefore are shaded by the taller alien species. Increased temperatures are also working against native grasses as they do not fair well in warmer climates. Add in a decrease in rainfall and the negative results of grazing herbivores like cow and elk and it is easy to see why native grasses do not need any more stress placed on them.

Exotic Grasses Encourage Wildfires and Food Crops to be Attacked

Alien species of grasses tend to flourish in warmer temperatures. Due to the climate change, temps all over California are rising and in turn could start to push out native grasses even faster. These invasive exotic species become parched during the summer months, leaving themselves prone to catching fire much more easily than native grasses. If that were not enough, certain species of alien grasses function as storage tanks for viruses and other bacteria that invade food crops. Other species gulp down the water that would typically be utilized by the native plants and grasses. One species in particular, the European beach grass, conceals deer mice that consume lupines, a native grass that is endangered. This detrimental exotic beach grass has overrun the majority of coasts in not only California, but Oregon and Washington as well.

Climate Change Is not the Only Way these Exotic Species Will Spread

As the climate becomes hotter and changes, so will the dispersion of the exotic grasses. While it is true that these invasive plants love hot weather, it is not the only way these species will be distributed across the state. Human interaction with nature is another way the native grasses could disappear from the Golden State. Areas accommodating native grasses that are disturbed by humans can be exposed to invasive exotic species. Once introduced, it does not take long for alien grasses to overrun the native species and if this happens enough, it could be permanently.

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Hello there, I’m the staff writer for SeaBirdAdventure.com. This is an exceptional gig because I’m given the opportunity to combine my love for writing with my love for Mother Nature and exciting new technologies. Plus, I get to do it all alongside some very talented, earth-conscious folks—very nice combination. But this certainly isn’t all about me. I invite all of you to comment on my blog posts, add your three cents, and even suggest future topics for me to write about. This is most definitely a combined effort. A blog post every single day? Sure thing…comin’ right up. Check back daily for new posts, tell your friends, tell your cat, and think and do green. To your green future, Andrew Rossillo

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1944: Camano Class Light Cargo Ship was laid down for the US Army as FS-289 at Wheeler Shipbuilding in Whitestone, NY.

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1945: Delivered to US Army.

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1950: Acquired by the US Navy on July 1, 1950 and placed in service as USNS New Bedford (T-AKL-17).

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1954: The movie, Mister Roberts, was made on the USNS New Bedford (T-AKL-17).

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1955 - 1963: Used as a cargo supply ship for the Texas Towers, a network of advanced radar stations located off the Eastern Seaboard. In 1957, Capt. Sixto Mangual was commander of the AKL-17 and in 1961 it was rechristened the USNS New Bedford. The New Bedford, sailing out of State Pier, was keeping vigil when Texas Tower No. 4 callapsed off the New Jersey coast during a January 1961 nor'easter.

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1963: Reclassified as Miscellaneous Unclassified (IX-308).

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1971: The New Bedford (IX-308) served as a Torpedo Test Firing Vessel in the Puget Sound area.

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1994: Ceremony in New Bedford.

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1995: The ship was struck from the Naval Register on April 4.

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2004: The Sea Bird's current disposition is a tuna long liner (fishing boat) out of San Diego, CA.

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2006: Design of the Tesla Turbine began on June 11, 2006. The Sea Bird was sold by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service for commercial service.

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2007: The Sea Bird was drydocked for renovations.

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2008: The Sea Bird setting sail to Sea-Tac in Seattle, WA.

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2009 - 2010: The Sea Bird is currently docked at Seattle Sea-Tac.

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