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Posted by Samina Cabral
Samina Cabral
Samina Cabral is a native Southern Californian who now resides on the shores of
User is currently offline
on Saturday, 19 May 2012
in Mother Nature in Outer Space

Don't Miss this Eclipse Tomorrow!

Tomorrow, unless a fog rolls in off the Pacific Ocean, an eclipse will be completely visible and partiallyHinode mission eclipse2011copy visible in parts of California and portions of the Southwest. The annular eclipse is expected to be seen by residents in parts of Eastern Asia and partially visible in the North Pacific, North America and Greenland as well according to NASA. Sadly, vast swaths of the country won’t even sneak a peek- the poor East Coast is left out of this eclipse.

During this annular eclipse the moon will not completely block out the sun but will cover most of it and leave a ring of light or “annulus.”  This ring of light is also being called a “ring of fire.” Prepare to hear several amateur renditions of Johnny Cash’s most popular song and hit single from 1963; “Ring of Fire.” If not that there will be tons of people humming it ceaselessly all day and night.

The Los Angeles Times has a city-by-city breakdown of when the eclipse is slated to begin, end, and peak in several California cities.

Griffith Observatory will have staff on hand Sunday night providing talks about the eclipse at their public viewing on the lawn. Their telescopes, available to use for free will have proper filters. At the Observatory's gift shop, the Stellar Emporium, official Griffith Observatory Solarama viewing filters and Griffith Observatory Eclipse Glasses will be sold for your viewing pleasure.

San Diego residents can start setting up to see it because it will begin there at 5:27 PST. But do not look directly at the sun! The LA Times warned you, we are warning you, and NASA is here to tell you how to go about this to keep your vision intact and not damage your eyes to the point of blindness.

Eclipses can be viewed safely by following these NASA instructions.

For photographers a special solar filter is necessary for capturing the phenomenon on film but shops are selling out fast! Enthusiasts with binoculars or telescopes are advised to purchase a filter for their equipment.

The LA Times is asking for photographs to be submitted by users via Twitter to @latimes or @lanow (#LATeclipse) or via their Facebook page.

If you miss this eclipse Sunday you can catch the next event which will be a total solar eclipse on November 13th.

The Hinode mission, which is a collaboration between NASA and Japan, will be taking images and video of the eclipse that will be viewable on the NASA website at a later time.

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Samina Cabral is a native Southern Californian who now resides on the shores of Lake Erie in Northeast Ohio. Samina and her husband believe that sustainability starts in the home and try to live their lives as simply as possible without compromising comfort.

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1944: Camano Class Light Cargo Ship was laid down for the US Army as FS-289 at Wheeler Shipbuilding in Whitestone, NY.

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1945: Delivered to US Army.

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1950: Acquired by the US Navy on July 1, 1950 and placed in service as USNS New Bedford (T-AKL-17).

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1954: The movie, Mister Roberts, was made on the USNS New Bedford (T-AKL-17).

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1955 - 1963: Used as a cargo supply ship for the Texas Towers, a network of advanced radar stations located off the Eastern Seaboard. In 1957, Capt. Sixto Mangual was commander of the AKL-17 and in 1961 it was rechristened the USNS New Bedford. The New Bedford, sailing out of State Pier, was keeping vigil when Texas Tower No. 4 callapsed off the New Jersey coast during a January 1961 nor'easter.

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1963: Reclassified as Miscellaneous Unclassified (IX-308).

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1971: The New Bedford (IX-308) served as a Torpedo Test Firing Vessel in the Puget Sound area.

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1994: Ceremony in New Bedford.

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1995: The ship was struck from the Naval Register on April 4.

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2004: The Sea Bird's current disposition is a tuna long liner (fishing boat) out of San Diego, CA.

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2006: Design of the Tesla Turbine began on June 11, 2006. The Sea Bird was sold by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service for commercial service.

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2007: The Sea Bird was drydocked for renovations.

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2008: The Sea Bird setting sail to Sea-Tac in Seattle, WA.

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2009 - 2010: The Sea Bird is currently docked at Seattle Sea-Tac.

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