An Eco-Friendly Company Since 2006!
    Join Now! 
Twitter YouTube RSS

Earth Blog

Individuals can help us by telling others, by being involved in the Earth Blog, by sharing your ideas with us and by forwarding your support to companies who you think should get involved!

Posted by Samina Cabral
Samina Cabral
Samina Cabral is a native Southern Californian who now resides on the shores of
User is currently offline
on Friday, 08 March 2013
in Mother Nature's Big and Small

Friday Creature Feature: High Arctic Camel

Dr. Natalia Rybczynski is a vertebrate paleontologist with the Canadian Museum of Nature and is extinct-high-arctic-camel- Julius-T-Csotonyiwell-acquainted with the Canadian High Arctic. She has led numerous expeditions into the area with the museum including three summer expeditions in 2006, 2008 and 2010 when she found 30 fossil fragments of a leg bone approximately three-and-a-half million years old.

"The first time I picked up a piece, I thought that it might be wood. It was only back at the field camp that I was able to ascertain it was not only bone, but also from a fossil mammal larger than anything we had seen so far from the deposits," said Rybczynski in a press release last week announcing the publication of the paper in Nature Communications that describes this giant mammal: a now extinct camel.

Researchers say these fragments found on Ellesmere Island, Nunavut are from the mid-Pliocene Epoch are a significant because they are the most northerly record for early camels. The ancestors of camels are known to have originated in North America about 45 million years ago.

The fragments were scanned with a 3D laser scanner to create a digital file for each piece of bone. This allowed researchers to virtually reassemble and align the leg without having to physically touch the pieces.

Dr. Mike Buckley at the University of Manchester in England confirmed the bones were from a camel with "collagen fingerprinting.” Buckley pioneered the technique which extracts tiny samples of collagen from bones to develop a profile that can be compared to other animals.

The profile from these fossilized bones was compared to those of 37 modern mammal species, and a bonus fossil of camel found in the Yukon, also in the Canadian Museum of Nature's collection.

The profile of the High Arctic Camel most closely matched modern camels, specifically dromedaries or a camels with only one hump and the Yukon giant camel.

The High Arctic Camel or Ellesmere Camel was comparable in body size to other giant camels like the Asian Paracamelus gigas and the Yukon giant camel- so about ten feet tall at the hump and up to 2,000 pounds: an estimated 29% larger than modern camels.

Paleontologists say the Ellesmere Camel probably had a thick winter coat, wide-flat feet for walking on snowy ground, and big eyes to help it forage for twigs and other woody material for meals.

“This is an important discovery because it provides the first evidence of camels living in the High Arctic region," said Rybczynski, "It extends the previous range of camels in North America northward by about 1,200 km, and suggests that the lineage that gave rise to modern camels may been originally adapted to living in an Arctic forest environment."

0 votes
Samina Cabral is a native Southern Californian who now resides on the shores of Lake Erie in Northeast Ohio. Samina and her husband believe that sustainability starts in the home and try to live their lives as simply as possible without compromising comfort.

Comments

Image Caption

1944: Camano Class Light Cargo Ship was laid down for the US Army as FS-289 at Wheeler Shipbuilding in Whitestone, NY.

Image Caption

1945: Delivered to US Army.

Image Caption

1950: Acquired by the US Navy on July 1, 1950 and placed in service as USNS New Bedford (T-AKL-17).

Image Caption

1954: The movie, Mister Roberts, was made on the USNS New Bedford (T-AKL-17).

Image Caption

1955 - 1963: Used as a cargo supply ship for the Texas Towers, a network of advanced radar stations located off the Eastern Seaboard. In 1957, Capt. Sixto Mangual was commander of the AKL-17 and in 1961 it was rechristened the USNS New Bedford. The New Bedford, sailing out of State Pier, was keeping vigil when Texas Tower No. 4 callapsed off the New Jersey coast during a January 1961 nor'easter.

Image Caption

1963: Reclassified as Miscellaneous Unclassified (IX-308).

Image Caption

1971: The New Bedford (IX-308) served as a Torpedo Test Firing Vessel in the Puget Sound area.

Image Caption

1994: Ceremony in New Bedford.

Image Caption

1995: The ship was struck from the Naval Register on April 4.

Image Caption

2004: The Sea Bird's current disposition is a tuna long liner (fishing boat) out of San Diego, CA.

Image Caption

2006: Design of the Tesla Turbine began on June 11, 2006. The Sea Bird was sold by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service for commercial service.

Image Caption

2007: The Sea Bird was drydocked for renovations.

Image Caption

2008: The Sea Bird setting sail to Sea-Tac in Seattle, WA.

Image Caption

2009 - 2010: The Sea Bird is currently docked at Seattle Sea-Tac.

Image Caption