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Posted by Samina Cabral
Samina Cabral
Samina Cabral is a native Southern Californian who now resides on the shores of
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on Saturday, 09 March 2013
in Mother Nature's Vegetation

Actions to Reduce Deforestation In Brazil are Working

There have been a few creatures I’ve featured on Fridays whose populations have been affected by pete-newton-brazil-rainforest-UMdeforestation- especially animals that live in the Amazon rainforest like the lowland tapir and the giant armadillo.

Animals aren’t usually the first thing that pops into a person’s mind when deforestation is mentioned. The air is usually the first topic of discussion because clearing trees affects air quality and most of us learn that in elementary school: “Trees help us breathe!”

Conserving biodiversity and Brazil’s recent commitment to reduce deforestation in order to lower carbon emissions in the country’s two million square miles of Amazon rainforest are probably what led to a University of Michigan (UM) study that explored the efficacy of Brazil’s policies.

The researchers used new remote-sensing-based datasets from over 200 protected areas in the Brazilian Amazon and sophisticated statistical analysis to judge the effectiveness of three categories of protected areas: strictly protected areas, sustainable use areas, and indigenous lands.

The UM study has found that strictly protected areas like national parks and biological reserves have been more effective at reducing deforestation in the Amazon rainforest than sustainable-use areas.

Sustainable-use areas allow for controlled resource extraction are still effective and let the people who have lived off the land continue to do so but more -for lack of a better word-sustainably.

The protected areas founded primarily with the rights and livelihoods of indigenous people performed well in areas where deforestation pressures are high.

Unsurprisingly the study found that all forms of protection successfully limit deforestation but the researchers pointed to a finding that was a shock.

“Perhaps the biggest surprise is the finding that indigenous lands perform the best when it comes to lower deforestation in contexts of high deforestation pressure,” said, Arun Agrawal, a professor of natural resources at UM SNRE and one of the study’s co-authors,  “Many observers have suggested that granting substantial autonomy and land rights to indigenous people over vast tracts of land in the Amazon will lead to high levels of deforestation because indigenous groups would want to take advantage of the resources at their disposal.

He added, “This study shows that — based on current evidence — such fears are misplaced.”

UM’s press office says the study is scheduled for online publication on Monday, March 11 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Samina Cabral is a native Southern Californian who now resides on the shores of Lake Erie in Northeast Ohio. Samina and her husband believe that sustainability starts in the home and try to live their lives as simply as possible without compromising comfort.

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1944: Camano Class Light Cargo Ship was laid down for the US Army as FS-289 at Wheeler Shipbuilding in Whitestone, NY.

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1945: Delivered to US Army.

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1950: Acquired by the US Navy on July 1, 1950 and placed in service as USNS New Bedford (T-AKL-17).

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1954: The movie, Mister Roberts, was made on the USNS New Bedford (T-AKL-17).

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1955 - 1963: Used as a cargo supply ship for the Texas Towers, a network of advanced radar stations located off the Eastern Seaboard. In 1957, Capt. Sixto Mangual was commander of the AKL-17 and in 1961 it was rechristened the USNS New Bedford. The New Bedford, sailing out of State Pier, was keeping vigil when Texas Tower No. 4 callapsed off the New Jersey coast during a January 1961 nor'easter.

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1963: Reclassified as Miscellaneous Unclassified (IX-308).

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1971: The New Bedford (IX-308) served as a Torpedo Test Firing Vessel in the Puget Sound area.

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1994: Ceremony in New Bedford.

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1995: The ship was struck from the Naval Register on April 4.

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2004: The Sea Bird's current disposition is a tuna long liner (fishing boat) out of San Diego, CA.

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2006: Design of the Tesla Turbine began on June 11, 2006. The Sea Bird was sold by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service for commercial service.

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2007: The Sea Bird was drydocked for renovations.

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2008: The Sea Bird setting sail to Sea-Tac in Seattle, WA.

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2009 - 2010: The Sea Bird is currently docked at Seattle Sea-Tac.

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