An Eco-Friendly Company Since 2006!
    Join Now! 
Twitter YouTube RSS

Earth Blog

Individuals can help us by telling others, by being involved in the Earth Blog, by sharing your ideas with us and by forwarding your support to companies who you think should get involved!

Posted by Samina Cabral
Samina Cabral
Samina Cabral is a native Southern Californian who now resides on the shores of
User is currently offline
on Thursday, 15 November 2012
in Mother Nature's Big and Small

Reading This Will Make You Yawn

There is a really annoying and childish game I like to play with my husband simply called “Yawn.”bonobos yawning e-demuru

It consists of me trying to get him to yawn by merely repeating the word “yawn” until either he yawns or I do and that causes him to “catch” the yawn. Needless to say he hates the game but I love it because yawning is one of those weird things humans do like sneezing when exiting a movie theater into the bright sun or photic sneeze reflex.

There are several theories as to why humans yawn: boredom, trying to get more oxygen to the brain, and apparently when we are aroused because nothing says “I think you’re sexy!” then a big ol’ normally- associated- with- boredom yawn! Though we have been involuntarily yawning since the day we were born we still don’t know why we do it and why it can be contagious in humans, dogs, and apes.

Elisabetta Palagi and Elisa Demuru from the University of Pisa, Italy studied contagious yawning in bonobos- a great ape and one of our closest living relatives. Over the three month study period the researchers recorded and  analyzed yawning in two adult male, six adult female, and four infant bonobos at Apenheul Primate Park in The Netherlands.

Palagi and Demuru observed bonobos that are bonded by either the ties of friendship or family are more likely to catch a yawn. Relaxed bonobos were also more likely to yawn and instances of yawning increased when the first bonobo to yawn was a senior member of the group.  

The senior- led yawning supports the theory that the action was used as a way to unconsciously communicate and coordinate activities.

However the only coordinated activity I can see stemming from this unconscious communication is going to sleep.  Perhaps mothers of young children unwilling to nap should start yawning every five seconds; really play it up with a long stretch of the arms, an exaggerated titled head, and huge audible yawn. NFL quarterbacks should start yawning in the huddle, the coach should yawn when a timeout is called: whenever we want someone to do what we want we should yawn.

"Though we are still far from a clear demonstration of a link between yawn contagion and empathy, the importance of social bonds in shaping this phenomenon in bonobos suggests that a basic form of empathy may play a role in modulating yawning behavior," the authors concluded.

0 votes
Samina Cabral is a native Southern Californian who now resides on the shores of Lake Erie in Northeast Ohio. Samina and her husband believe that sustainability starts in the home and try to live their lives as simply as possible without compromising comfort.

Comments

Image Caption

1944: Camano Class Light Cargo Ship was laid down for the US Army as FS-289 at Wheeler Shipbuilding in Whitestone, NY.

Image Caption

1945: Delivered to US Army.

Image Caption

1950: Acquired by the US Navy on July 1, 1950 and placed in service as USNS New Bedford (T-AKL-17).

Image Caption

1954: The movie, Mister Roberts, was made on the USNS New Bedford (T-AKL-17).

Image Caption

1955 - 1963: Used as a cargo supply ship for the Texas Towers, a network of advanced radar stations located off the Eastern Seaboard. In 1957, Capt. Sixto Mangual was commander of the AKL-17 and in 1961 it was rechristened the USNS New Bedford. The New Bedford, sailing out of State Pier, was keeping vigil when Texas Tower No. 4 callapsed off the New Jersey coast during a January 1961 nor'easter.

Image Caption

1963: Reclassified as Miscellaneous Unclassified (IX-308).

Image Caption

1971: The New Bedford (IX-308) served as a Torpedo Test Firing Vessel in the Puget Sound area.

Image Caption

1994: Ceremony in New Bedford.

Image Caption

1995: The ship was struck from the Naval Register on April 4.

Image Caption

2004: The Sea Bird's current disposition is a tuna long liner (fishing boat) out of San Diego, CA.

Image Caption

2006: Design of the Tesla Turbine began on June 11, 2006. The Sea Bird was sold by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service for commercial service.

Image Caption

2007: The Sea Bird was drydocked for renovations.

Image Caption

2008: The Sea Bird setting sail to Sea-Tac in Seattle, WA.

Image Caption

2009 - 2010: The Sea Bird is currently docked at Seattle Sea-Tac.

Image Caption