An Eco-Friendly Company Since 2006!
    Join Now! 
Twitter YouTube RSS

Earth Blog

Individuals can help us by telling others, by being involved in the Earth Blog, by sharing your ideas with us and by forwarding your support to companies who you think should get involved!

Posted by Andrew Rossillo
Andrew Rossillo
Hello there, I’m the staff writer for SeaBirdAdventure.com. This is an exception
User is currently offline
on Friday, 09 September 2011
in Mother Nature's News

San Diego Shark Sightings Close Beaches and Scare Swimmers...Again

Two miles of La Jolla Beach, California were closed August 31, 2011 due to a shark sighting. Lifeguard policy is to close the area for at least 24 hours after a shark is sighted. Mission Beach, California was closed for two days one week prior to the La Jolla sighting after beach goers saw two sharks in the area. It was not determined if the shark at La Jolla was one of the sharks seen at Mission Beach. Shark sightings are more common at La Jolla than at Mission Beach, possibly because the sharks are interested in the area's seal population.

shark sightings-shark activity

There has been a lot of speculation about why shark sightings, and inevitably shark attacks, are on the rise globally. Overfishing is one possible cause. As food sources in the oceans are depleted, sharks could be turning to man for an alternative food source. While this certainly is a possibility, the undeniable fact is that growing numbers of people playing in the ocean creates a higher likelihood for shark attacks simply through the law of large numbers. In the severe economic slump of 2009, fewer people were able to afford a trip to the beach, and as a result, shark attacks in Florida were more infrequent, even as shark attack incidents around the globe were on the rise. In 2010 as the economy made a partial recovery and people once again spent the money for a beach vacation, shark attacks rose 25%.

Experts tell us that sharks do not mean to attack people, they prefer to eat fish. This is small consolation, however, to the victims. South Africa leads the rest of the world in shark attacks. An abundance of local wildlife to attract the sharks, mild water temperatures and a lack of adequate safeguards in the country could be partially to blame. In Southern California, about six sharks were sighted in early August this year.

Experts offer this advice to avoid shark attacks:

  • Never to go into the ocean alone.
  • Avoid swimming in the dark or at twilight.
  • Remove all jewelry before going into the ocean.
  • Avoid the ocean if you have an open wound.
  • Stay close to the shore.
  • Avoid excessive splashing and making erratic movements.
  • Never take dogs in the water with you.
  • Avoid areas where seals, sea lions and other marine mammals are hanging around.
  • Avoid areas where people are fishing.
  • Menstruating women should avoid the ocean entirely.

The presence of a shark rarely leads to an unprovoked attack on humans, but it is always better to err on the side of safety. In 51 percent of all shark attacks, the victim is surfing. Experts say that the human body looks more like a fish in the horizontal position, possibly causing the shark to get confused.

Though it is always safer to keep people out of the water when sharks are around, it is also important to remember the relatively few attacks that actually occur. Don’t let unfounded paranoia ruin your appreciation of the ocean’s gifts!

0 votes
Hello there, I’m the staff writer for SeaBirdAdventure.com. This is an exceptional gig because I’m given the opportunity to combine my love for writing with my love for Mother Nature and exciting new technologies. Plus, I get to do it all alongside some very talented, earth-conscious folks—very nice combination. But this certainly isn’t all about me. I invite all of you to comment on my blog posts, add your three cents, and even suggest future topics for me to write about. This is most definitely a combined effort. A blog post every single day? Sure thing…comin’ right up. Check back daily for new posts, tell your friends, tell your cat, and think and do green. To your green future, Andrew Rossillo

Comments

Image Caption

1944: Camano Class Light Cargo Ship was laid down for the US Army as FS-289 at Wheeler Shipbuilding in Whitestone, NY.

Image Caption

1945: Delivered to US Army.

Image Caption

1950: Acquired by the US Navy on July 1, 1950 and placed in service as USNS New Bedford (T-AKL-17).

Image Caption

1954: The movie, Mister Roberts, was made on the USNS New Bedford (T-AKL-17).

Image Caption

1955 - 1963: Used as a cargo supply ship for the Texas Towers, a network of advanced radar stations located off the Eastern Seaboard. In 1957, Capt. Sixto Mangual was commander of the AKL-17 and in 1961 it was rechristened the USNS New Bedford. The New Bedford, sailing out of State Pier, was keeping vigil when Texas Tower No. 4 callapsed off the New Jersey coast during a January 1961 nor'easter.

Image Caption

1963: Reclassified as Miscellaneous Unclassified (IX-308).

Image Caption

1971: The New Bedford (IX-308) served as a Torpedo Test Firing Vessel in the Puget Sound area.

Image Caption

1994: Ceremony in New Bedford.

Image Caption

1995: The ship was struck from the Naval Register on April 4.

Image Caption

2004: The Sea Bird's current disposition is a tuna long liner (fishing boat) out of San Diego, CA.

Image Caption

2006: Design of the Tesla Turbine began on June 11, 2006. The Sea Bird was sold by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service for commercial service.

Image Caption

2007: The Sea Bird was drydocked for renovations.

Image Caption

2008: The Sea Bird setting sail to Sea-Tac in Seattle, WA.

Image Caption

2009 - 2010: The Sea Bird is currently docked at Seattle Sea-Tac.

Image Caption