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Posted by Andrew Rossillo
Andrew Rossillo
Hello there, I’m the staff writer for SeaBirdAdventure.com. This is an exception
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on Saturday, 27 August 2011
in Mother Nature's News

Shark Sightings Spark Mission Beach Closure Two Days in a Row

Banning the public from entering ocean waters due to a shark sighting is not an uncommon occurrence to take place two to three times annually. However, a two-mile coastal stretch of sand and water in Mission Beach, CA was closed on Thursday and Friday, August 25th and 26th due to separate shark sightings. A lifeguard caught a glimpse of the first shark on Thursday afternoon while out paddle boarding, while a local surfer spotted the second dorsal fin on Friday morning around 8 A.M. Two different fin sizes were reported, leading authorities to believe there were two different sharks in the area.

san diego california shark sighting

Along with closing down water access to the public, lifeguards patrolled the waters in boats and personal watercrafts in hopes of finding the sighted sharks. On top of these efforts, the fire helicopter crew of San Diego hovered above the two-mile water radius, fervently scanning the ocean for any sign of the alleged predators. From the reported size of the fins (one at 19 inches and the other at 14 inches) it is thought the sharks are of the great white species.

One theory as to why two sharks were spotted in the same area in the same time frame deals with gill net fishing. 21 years ago, gill netting was banned along much of California's coast due to the substantial amount of detriment inflicted upon a plethora of different species. The target of gill net fishing was more often than not White Sea bass and halibut, however a residual effect of this style of angling was killing animal populations of sea birds, Southern sea lions and baby great white sharks. Experts say that enough time has passed since the ban for the juvenile shark population to increase in numbers again.

It is common for adult female sharks to migrate away from Southern California in late August while their offspring often stay in the area until the water turns colder, usually in December or January. It is thought by several experts from the Scripps Institute of Oceanography that there are probably more than just the two great white sharks spotted earlier in the week lurking along the coast. The reason for this thinking is that with the juvenile shark numbers being up there is probably a small cluster of these predators following their food. Baby great white sharks are not developed enough to feed on sea lions and seals so they often feed on schools of fish inhabiting kelp beds.

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Hello there, I’m the staff writer for SeaBirdAdventure.com. This is an exceptional gig because I’m given the opportunity to combine my love for writing with my love for Mother Nature and exciting new technologies. Plus, I get to do it all alongside some very talented, earth-conscious folks—very nice combination. But this certainly isn’t all about me. I invite all of you to comment on my blog posts, add your three cents, and even suggest future topics for me to write about. This is most definitely a combined effort. A blog post every single day? Sure thing…comin’ right up. Check back daily for new posts, tell your friends, tell your cat, and think and do green. To your green future, Andrew Rossillo

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1944: Camano Class Light Cargo Ship was laid down for the US Army as FS-289 at Wheeler Shipbuilding in Whitestone, NY.

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1945: Delivered to US Army.

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1950: Acquired by the US Navy on July 1, 1950 and placed in service as USNS New Bedford (T-AKL-17).

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1954: The movie, Mister Roberts, was made on the USNS New Bedford (T-AKL-17).

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1955 - 1963: Used as a cargo supply ship for the Texas Towers, a network of advanced radar stations located off the Eastern Seaboard. In 1957, Capt. Sixto Mangual was commander of the AKL-17 and in 1961 it was rechristened the USNS New Bedford. The New Bedford, sailing out of State Pier, was keeping vigil when Texas Tower No. 4 callapsed off the New Jersey coast during a January 1961 nor'easter.

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1963: Reclassified as Miscellaneous Unclassified (IX-308).

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1971: The New Bedford (IX-308) served as a Torpedo Test Firing Vessel in the Puget Sound area.

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1994: Ceremony in New Bedford.

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1995: The ship was struck from the Naval Register on April 4.

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2004: The Sea Bird's current disposition is a tuna long liner (fishing boat) out of San Diego, CA.

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2006: Design of the Tesla Turbine began on June 11, 2006. The Sea Bird was sold by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service for commercial service.

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2007: The Sea Bird was drydocked for renovations.

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2008: The Sea Bird setting sail to Sea-Tac in Seattle, WA.

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2009 - 2010: The Sea Bird is currently docked at Seattle Sea-Tac.

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