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Posted by Samina Cabral
Samina Cabral
Samina Cabral is a native Southern Californian who now resides on the shores of
User is currently offline
on Thursday, 08 March 2012
in Mother Nature's Big and Small

You Police like a Chimpanzee...

George Constanza, a character from the popular 90‘s sitcom Seinfeld, once shouted: “We’re living in a society here!” during one of his famous rants. 

Chimpanzees would agree which is why they engage in impartial third-party conflict management or “policing.” The hierarchy observed amongst chimpanzees is used to maintain order and keep peace inbaby chimp the group. Peacekeeping may be even more important to the alpha chimpanzees than any personal gain from being in charge.

Primatologists from the University of Zurich, including the study’s lead author Claudia Rudolf von Rohr, studied four groups of chimpanzees living in zoos to bring us this study.

So what qualities are needed to make a chimpanzee a good cop? Do they need a criminology degree? Do they attend an academy? No. All a chimpanzee needs is some good ol’fashioned R-E-S-P-E-C-T.

Chimpanzee conflict managers are generally high-ranking males or females that are revered in their community. If a chimpanzee does not hold sway within the group conflicts can go unresolved.

The hierarchy within the group can shift and the researchers witnessed this at the Walter Zoo in the East Switzerland city of Gossau. The group there was experiencing some reconfiguring: new females were being introduced and the ranking of the males was changing. Rudolf von Rohr was excited to see behaviors in the wild being exhibited in the zoo setting as it added another level of depth to the study. What would the social upheaval mean for the dynamics of the group? Would the authority of the current alpha male shift?

The long-reigning alpha male named Ces was replaced by Dig, who had attempted to take the top spot before and failed but managed to succeed, in a peaceful transfer of power, after the introduction of more chimpanzees. Two of the introduced females ranked right under Ces during the observation period.

Researchers were extremely hands-off during the study. They neither encouraged nor asked the zoo to introduce new chimps while they were observing the existing group. They did not induce aggression or separate any chimpanzees. They chose to record only spontaneous behavior.

"The interest in community concern that is highly developed in us humans and forms the basis for our moral behavior is deeply rooted. It can also be observed in our closest relatives," said Rudolf von Rohr. In other words: Chimpanzees and humans see, chimpanzees and humans do.

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Samina Cabral is a native Southern Californian who now resides on the shores of Lake Erie in Northeast Ohio. Samina and her husband believe that sustainability starts in the home and try to live their lives as simply as possible without compromising comfort.

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1944: Camano Class Light Cargo Ship was laid down for the US Army as FS-289 at Wheeler Shipbuilding in Whitestone, NY.

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1945: Delivered to US Army.

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1950: Acquired by the US Navy on July 1, 1950 and placed in service as USNS New Bedford (T-AKL-17).

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1954: The movie, Mister Roberts, was made on the USNS New Bedford (T-AKL-17).

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1955 - 1963: Used as a cargo supply ship for the Texas Towers, a network of advanced radar stations located off the Eastern Seaboard. In 1957, Capt. Sixto Mangual was commander of the AKL-17 and in 1961 it was rechristened the USNS New Bedford. The New Bedford, sailing out of State Pier, was keeping vigil when Texas Tower No. 4 callapsed off the New Jersey coast during a January 1961 nor'easter.

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1963: Reclassified as Miscellaneous Unclassified (IX-308).

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1971: The New Bedford (IX-308) served as a Torpedo Test Firing Vessel in the Puget Sound area.

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1994: Ceremony in New Bedford.

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1995: The ship was struck from the Naval Register on April 4.

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2004: The Sea Bird's current disposition is a tuna long liner (fishing boat) out of San Diego, CA.

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2006: Design of the Tesla Turbine began on June 11, 2006. The Sea Bird was sold by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service for commercial service.

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2007: The Sea Bird was drydocked for renovations.

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2008: The Sea Bird setting sail to Sea-Tac in Seattle, WA.

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2009 - 2010: The Sea Bird is currently docked at Seattle Sea-Tac.

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